Words associated with elephants

Words associated with elephants

Big words: elephant ‘speaks’ korean

The noun elephant is derived from the Latin word “elephantus,” which was derived from a Greek word that meant “ivory” or “elephant.” It was first used in English in the 14th century, when it replaced the Old French word “oliphant.”
World Elephant Day, which has been observed annually since 2012 to raise awareness of the plight of Asian and African elephants, took place yesterday, August 12. Poaching, habitat destruction, and mistreatment in captivity, even for tourism purposes, are all threats to elephants; one of the goals of World Elephant Day is to encourage visitors to see elephants in non-exploitative and healthy habitats. Elephants, as befitting the world’s largest land animal, play a significant role in our language and culture. Elephantine defines someone or something that is big, sluggish, and ungainly (a bit hard on elephants, which can move at more than 25 kph and certainly do not lack grace). A white elephant is an unwanted and useless item or a costly project that has failed. The more recent black elephant is a rare but serious threat that everyone is aware of but no one wants to talk about. The expression the elephant in the room often has this sense of a big issue that is purposefully overlooked. When we claim that someone has the hide of an elephant (or a rhinoceros), we are referring to their thick skin, which makes them difficult or impossible to upset. (The term pachyderm refers to all of these species and is derived from the Greek terms for “thick” and “skin.”) The American phrase “to see the elephant” refers to gaining world experience. Elephants are known to never forget, so having a memory like an elephant is similar to having a very long memory.

Short essay on ‘elephant’ (100 words) // essay on elephant in

Elephants are an example of a keystone species that contributes to ecosystem biodiversity. Elephant footprints can fill with water, creating micro-ecosystems for other species, and they establish paths in dense forested environments that enable other animals to move. Gorillas, whales, polar bears, pandas, lions, and rhinoceroses are examples of keystone species. Preserving and protecting these animals often assists in the protection of their ecosystems and the other organisms that share them.
Poaching is described as “trespassing, particularly on another’s game preserve, in order to steal animals or hunt.” What you do not realize is the degree to which modern poaching has an impact. According to World Wildlife Fund researchers, an estimated 20,000 elephants are slaughtered each year for their ivory. Elephants aren’t the only species killed by poachers. Other endangered animals, such as tigers, rhinoceroses, and pangolins, are also in danger, with their parts being poached for use as status symbols, traditional medicine, clothes, and food.

English idioms with explanation | elephant in the room

Elephants are mentioned in Hindu scriptures, Buddhist and Jain texts, and Gaja (a Sanskrit word for elephant) is one of them. A gaja personifies a variety of positive qualities, including abundance, fertility, and wealth; boldness and strength; wisdom and royalty, to name a few. It means “physically beautiful girl” in European Portuguese; its roots in the Portuguese language can be traced back to a personification of fertility, as previously mentioned.
In the background of Ancient Indian culture, the earliest depictions of gaja can be found on seals discovered at Indus Valley Civilization sites (such as Harappa and Mohenjo Daro) (3000 BC – 1700 BC). Elephants had been tamed and domesticated by that time, according to some historians, and were being used for peaceful and probably other purposes. A Wild Elephant is mentioned in Rigveda 8-33-8. 1st Megasthenes, the Greek ambassador to Chandragupta Maurya’s court, mentions the use of war elephants in battle.
Elephants became an important part of Indian life and society over several centuries, especially in religious culture, royalty, and the aristocratic class. Elephant capture, taming, and preparation has evolved into a professional art. A number of treatises on elephant care and management were written in Ancient India, including the following:

How to describe an elephant

There are 18 terms that begin with elephant. To find words that start with elephant, use our Scrabble Word Finder, Words With Friends cheat dictionary, or WordHub word solver. Alternatively, you can use our Unscramble word solver to come up with the best possible match! Words that start with “elephant”
Elephant is a 15-letter word that begins with the letter E.
Elephant is a 13-letter word that begins with the letter E.
Elephant words are 12-letter words that begin with the letter E.
11-letter words that begin with the letter E
Elephant is a 10-letter word that begins with the letter E.
Elephant-related nine-letter words
Elephant-related eight-letter words
Often see
Elephant is a 15-letter word that begins with the letter E.
Elephant is a 13-letter word that begins with the letter E.
Elephant words are 12-letter words that begin with the letter E.
11-letter words that begin with the letter E
Elephant is a 10-letter word that begins with the letter E.
Elephant-related nine-letter words
Elephant-related eight-letter words
Also see:

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