Ubuntu 16.04 internet not working

Ubuntu 16.04 internet not working

How to fix device not managed on ubuntu 16.04, 18.04

My Ubuntu 16.04 server network card now has a static IP address. I can connect to and from the LAN network, and I can also ping 8.8.8.8, but the server does not have Internet access. (With the DHCP link, all is fine.) The contents of my /etc/network/interfaces directory are as follows:
It selects the first DNS server to respond (in order) as the recipient of the query. If your first DNS server only has local addresses, it will crash. To debug this, use the nslookup software. Another file (somewhere) called nsswitch controls the order in which names are looked up. You shouldn’t have to fiddle with it, though. All that should be required is the resolv.conf file. In the case of Ubuntu, settings can be found in the interface config file. However, resolve.conf should suffice. (Excuse my vagueness; I’m a rhel guy myself.)
It selects the first DNS server to answer (in order) as the recipient of the query. If your first DNS server only has local addresses, it will fail. To debug this, use the nslookup software. Another file (somewhere) called nsswitch controls the order in which names are looked up. You shouldn’t have to fiddle with it, though. All that should be required is the resolv.conf file. In the case of Ubuntu, settings can be found in the interface config file. However, resolve.conf should suffice. (Excuse my vagueness; I’m a rhel guy myself.)

Lan connected but no internet access in ubuntu-ethernet

On Saturday, one of our laptops, which was running Ubuntu 16.04 zesty, was unable to connect to the Internet. It was able to ping IPs and bind to the router, but DNS lookups failed, so no browsing was possible. After doing some research online, I discovered that in zesty, Ubuntu migrated to a new form of DNS resolver (systemd-resolved), which is causing problems for some users. We seem to have been affected by this, but I have no idea why the issue appeared so quickly after running perfectly for weeks after upgrading to zesty.

Problem wifi resolved on ubuntu 15.04,16.04 ,17.04

The NetworkManager app that comes with Ubuntu aims to make your network connections “just work.” Nonetheless, things do go wrong from time to time. When using a laptop, you can need to alter or change your link settings, just as you would in Windows. To make your Internet connection work, you won’t need to open a terminal and type any arcane commands. Next, go into the fundamentals. Try connecting to the Internet on other computers before accusing Ubuntu. If they’re having the same problem, it’s not because of Ubuntu; it’s because of anything else. It’s possible that you’ll need to reboot your router, modem, or both. Before moving on to more advanced troubleshooting, it’s always a good idea to double-check these basics.
Hardware switches on certain laptops can be toggled to easily allow or disable Wi-Fi. Check your laptop’s hardware Wi-Fi switch if your Wi-Fi doesn’t seem to be working at all. If you’re using a wired link, make sure the ethernet cable is securely plugged into the ethernet port on both the device and the router. Sure, it may seem simple, but it’s easy to forget a snagged switch or a dangling cord. Arrange your router, device, and other items in your home for the best possible Wi-Fi signal quality to overcome signal strength issues with Wi-Fi networks. In NetworkManager, set up your link settings. When you plug in an ethernet cable, NetworkManager automatically links to Wi-Fi networks and configures wired network connections. Before NetworkManager, you’d have to use terminal commands to accomplish this.

Solve internet connection problem on ubuntu 17.04

The Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) feature allows one device to share its Internet connection with another. A device with an Internet connection must be programmed to serve as an Internet gateway in order to achieve this. The gateway computer links a second computer (or network of computers) to the Internet indirectly. ICS may be needed in the following situations:
Select Settings->Network->Wireless from the drop-down menu. and create a new ad hoc network Choose WEP for protection and generate a 5-letter password from 0..9A..F to use as a common denominator for all devices. It’s worth noting that this is the least stable encryption standard available.
If you want to share an Internet connection, you’ll need two network cards or ports on your computer. This means you have at least one Ethernet port with the name “eth0” assigned to it. The port eth0 will be used by other computers to bind to you. When you’re signed in, you can do the following: There will be a new window open. Adjust the Method to “Shared to other machines” on the tab labeled “IPv4 Settings.” You should now be able to connect any device to the other Ethernet port or share via your wireless card after restarting the computer. Note: To explain the preceding case, here is a working example configuration: Note: If you’re connecting a router, especially one with wireless, and you want users to share your connection, you’ll need to do the following: iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -j MASQUERADE sudo iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -j MASQUERADE

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