Tomato port forwarding

Tomato port forwarding

Tomato firmware web interface.

The Device List displays a list of the current devices to which the DHCP server has allocated an IP address. Devices are grouped by Interface, which shows where they are linked to the router:
Instantaneous
The Real-Time Bandwidth segment provides a graph of the last 10 minutes of bandwidth consumption, updated every two seconds. The top-level tabs allow you to pick one of the different interfaces to get more information about that interface’s bandwidth.
The previous 24 hours
The Last 24 Hours segment provides a graph of bandwidth use and total data for the previous 4/6/12/18/24 hours, updated every two minutes. The top-level tabs allow you to pick one of the different interfaces to get more information about that interface’s bandwidth.
Every day
The Regular segment shows a table with a row for each day that shows download, upload, and overall bandwidth use. The default unit is gigabytes (GB), but it can be modified to megabytes (MB) or kilobytes (KB).
once a week
The Weekly segment shows a table with a row for each week that shows download, upload, and overall bandwidth use. GB (Gigabytes) is the default unit, but it can be modified to MB or KB. Sun (Sunday) is the default week start day, although it can be updated. There is a choice of showing Summary or Full results.

[howto] turn a lan port into a wan port!! [linksys

If all of these work, there’s nothing wrong with your setup (which I’ll assume is correct), and your problem is just accessing the public IP from within the network (either directly or via DynDNS). This means that your router must have NAT reflection activated (if possible) in order to route internal requests for the public IP as if they were external requests.
If that doesn’t work, try forwarding a port higher than 1024 (some ISPs won’t let non-business subscribers use ports lower than 1024). Also, make sure you update the line in the conf I just mentioned to represent the same value if you do this.

Complete black ops: cold war port forwarding | open nat

This means that you can allow selective routing by adding a couple of firewall rules if you only want one or a few devices connected to your Tomato router to use VPN connections. To accomplish this, follow the steps below:
The IP address to modify (in the above firewall rules) is the IP address of the device you want to connect to the VPN with. If you need to connect more than one device to the VPN, simply copy the same rule ( ip rule add from *IP address that you want to change* lookup 200) and replace the IP address with the IP address of the other device.

How to put a pia vpn on a tomato router

“Cut Through Forwarding (CTF) is a Tomato setting that was allowed in Advanced > Miscellaneous. The setting is supposed to provide a small performance boost by bypassing some protocol overhead, but it comes with some disadvantages, one of which is the inability to use port forwarding. I was able to use port forwarding after turning off CTF.”
If you’re having problems with port forwarding or UPNP on Advanced Tomato or Tomato Shibby firmware and are using PPPoE to connect to a bridged DSL modem, make sure “Use DHCP” is turned off under “WAN settings” on the “Basic Settings” tab. While DHCP is required for the LAN portion, having it enabled under the WAN settings prevented all port forwarding, DMZ, and UPNP from working.
It’s a very comprehensive firmware, much superior to the stock Netgear R7000 firmware, but there are a few quirks here and there.
Other strange activity with port forwarding has been documented here and elsewhere by some people.

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