Synology https not secure

Synology https not secure

How to secure your synology dsm

In this article, I’ll walk you through installing a trusted 3rd party SSL/TLS certificate on your Synology NAS system, as well as how to use it with Synology web services (websites/Owncloud). I’ll also demonstrate how to set up an HTTP -> HTTPS redirect in Owncloud 9 and DSM 6, with Apache 2.2. I won’t go into how to create a trusted third-party certificate; there are plenty of certificate providers and guidance on the internet.
Synology NAS comes with one self-signed certificate (you can build more if you want) that is used by default for Synology’s web enabled services (WebDav, Cloud Station, FTPS, and so on). It is not supported by a trusted third-party CA, but it may be sufficient for certain purposes among the people and networks you are familiar with.
Further, you must determine if you want your new certificate to be deployed for all Synology web enabled services (the default), or only for certain virtual hosts or all of them. This has a direct bearing on the type of certificate you will get. Are you going to get a wildcard certificate that covers all of your domain’s sub-sites at once, or are you going to get separate certificates for each of your domain’s hosts?

06 – (1/3) how to install let’s encrypt certificate on synology

I have the same issue any time I leave my home network and need to get something from my Synology NAS. Who is sniffing my network, and to whom will I be handing over my credentials in plain text via HTTP?
Of course, you can increase the security of your Synology account by using two-factor authentication or connecting to a (preferably private) VPN link first. Even then, the digital footprint of confidential data you leave behind isn’t worth it.
You might get a self-signed SSL/TLS certificate to solve this issue, but the process will take time and money. However, thanks to the good people at Let’s Encrypt, the whole process now takes 15 minutes and is completely free!
If you set your certificate’s “Subject Alternative Name” and want to protect the URL with the same certificate. Don’t forget to configure Reverse Proxy rules for that URL, as well as the proper certificate. As a result,

How to secure your synology dsm

Let’s Encrypt on Synology Diskstation – If done correctly, making your Synology Diskstation web-accessible can be both useful and secure. Synology Moments (for photos) and Surveillance Station (for security cameras) both run over HTTPS, so you can access them from anywhere in the world if you’ve set up your Synology correctly. Some ventures, such as Self-Hosting a Password Manager, also include SSL.
**NOTE: This includes port forwarding from your router to your Synology Diskstation. If something goes wrong with your network, I’m not responsible. To harden your Synology Diskstation, do your due diligence and obey best practices (strong password, 2FA and enabling the firewall come to mind). Before you begin, make sure you understand what you’re doing.
This is the part where you get to choose your own domain name and purchase it from a domain registrar. Hover is what I use. A standard.com domain that isn’t a top level keyword could cost about $13 per year (from Hover). Continue reading after you’ve made your order.

18 – (3/3) let’s encrypt certificate renewal on synology test

I’d really appreciate it if you could assist me here… I can’t seem to get my SSL certificate to display as stable. TIA!!! Here is my example. I purchased the domain example.com, built the CSR for Mysyn.example.com in my synology, imported the keys, and everything appears to be in order inside the synology. I went out and built a dyndns alias for my IP address, which I set up in Synology to update on a regular basis. I set up a cname with my registrar to point Mysyn.example.com to the dyndns name, and I can access my synology without issue from the outside, but my certificate is marked as not protected. I’ve been banging my head against the wall trying to find something out, and I’m sure it’s something simple that I’m missing. Any assistance will be greatly appreciated…
Your certificate’s name must be typed in as the URL; you can use CNAME to point it to your dyndns address, but you can’t type it in as the URL because the certificate isn’t valid for it.
If you need assistance, don’t just offer one-word answers.
That would have sufficed if it had been a third-party public certificate.
What is the actual mistake, and what does the certificate on the connection you use show – if you want me to look at it, please paste the URL.

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