Pfsense vmware workstation

Pfsense vmware workstation

How to install pfsense on vmware workstation

Colin Westwater, a pfSense user, demonstrates how he set up his firewall in a VMware virtual environment. pfSense is a free and open-source firewall that runs on FreeBSD. The complete set of instructions can be found at the link below.
I use pfSense to isolate the different labs I run, and my lab is fully nested in VMware Workstation v14. In this blog post, I’ll show you how to set it up as a virtual machine in Workstation and then use it to isolate some nested virtual machines.
pfSense serves as a virtual router/firewall, allowing me to run anything I want behind it, such as AD, DHCP, vCenter, and so on, without interfering with my home network. The list of features that pfSense can provide is long. In this blog post, I’m using pfSense 2.4.3.

Installing pfsense 2.4.2 on vmware workstation 14 pro

On your WAN interface, pfSense blocks the use of private RFC1918 addresses by default (this includes your 192.168.x.x among others). That setting must be disabled. “Block bogon networks” is the environment (exact spelling may be incorrect) (the keyword is “bogon” at least). Find it and turn it off; this will solve all of your problems.
Bloack Private Networks is still unticked, and Bogon Networks is ticked, but like you said, I don’t believe it’s that. I was thinking it could be a firewall rule thing, but I’ve tried adding both of them (just to test the theory).
So, for pfSense, I’ve allocated a network adaptor as bridged and added four LAN segments, all of which are configured within pfSense; the bridged network link must be working because it’s getting Internet connectivity.
Let’s take it one step at a time, before these responses become too long to keep track of.
Let’s start with the “login to web GUI from home LAN.” If your pfSense can ping the Internet, as you said, then you have complete connectivity and all you need are some firewall rules to allow specific traffic. Firewall rules that allow incoming connections arriving at the WAN port are required to connect from your home network to pfSense’s WAN port. As any firewall/router will do out-of-the-box, that would be blocked by default. Even though it’s all on your home LAN, you’re trying to do remote management over the Internet from pfSense’s perspective (your home LAN is functioning as pfSense’s Internet), so take a look at this:

How to install and configure pfsense 2.4.5 firewall + vmware

I use pfSense to isolate the different labs I run, and my lab is fully nested in VMware Workstation v14. In this blog post, I’ll show you how to set it up as a virtual machine in Workstation and then use it to isolate some nested virtual machines.
pfSense serves as a virtual router/firewall, allowing me to run anything I want behind it, such as AD, DHCP, vCenter, and so on, without interfering with my home network. The list of features that pfSense can provide is long. In this blog post, I’m using pfSense 2.4.3.
So far, we’ve got a simple configuration. The WAN gui on pfSense allows it to connect with the outside world. The LAN interface must now be configured. This is the interface that your lab can use to connect with the outside world as the default gateway.
Connect a VM to the LAN Segment used for the LAN interface and set a valid IP address on the subnet to access the web console. Start a web browser and make sure you can ping the pfSense LAN IP address.
It’s a long series of instructions, but after you’ve done it a few times, pfSense will be very simple to configure for your needs. You can also set up a DMZ, firewall rules, and multiple LAN interfaces to segment traffic, among other items.

Installing pfsense on vmware

On my desktop, I’ve installed pfSense to serve as a firewall for some virtual machines. As of now, my WAN is a NAT address, and my LANs are a few different host-only networks. For the networks, pfSense also supported DHCP. Except for when I start or reboot a virtual machine, everything works fine. It gets an IP from DHCP just fine, but I don’t have access to the internet. I may ping other devices on the same network and the firewall from the vm, but nothing else. I can’t ping the vm from the firewall at first, but it becomes possible after a while, and once I’ve managed to ping the vm from the firewall, the vm has complete network access. I haven’t managed to time how long I have to wait, but it is usually a few minutes. Has anyone else had this problem, and if so, is there a quick fix? Any assistance will be extremely helpful. 12 answers 50 percentsavehidereportsavehidereportsavehidereportsa Voted up This discussion has been ended. There are no new comments or votes that can be made. Sort by the strongest.

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