Pfsense change dns

Pfsense change dns

Providing local dns with pfsense

Copy the content between the ca>/ca> tags into the field Certificate Data in one of the *.conf files from the pfsense op24 udp v4 AES128CBC AU in ci.zip folder, as seen in the lower picture on the left.
Configure the OpenVPN client as follows (this documentation uses the Amsterdam server): Deactivate the function. Automatically create a TLS Key and paste the text from the *.conf file between the tls-auth>/tls-auth> tags into the field TLS Key. Tip: Depending on your router’s CPU performance, you may be able to get better speed and bandwidth by using the weaker encryption AES-128-CBC. In this case, the encryption algorithm to use is AES-128-CBC.
Click on the pen symbol to open the IPv4 rule (edit). Select VPN PP AMSTERDAM VPN4 as the Gateway by enabling Advanced Options. The configuration should look like the lower picture on the left after saving.
Select the VPN Interface (VPN PP AMSTERDAM) from the Outgoing Network Interfaces menu under Services DNS Resolver. Note: By default, DNS requests are sent directly to your ISP, which is why, in order to avoid DNS leaks, you should use a VPN interface for outgoing DNS requests.

Local dns with pfsense 2.4

Hello there, I followed the excellent video on how to set up pfSense and PIA with a Killswitch and now have it working. However, depending on whether the host is using the standard WAN interface or the PIA interface, I’d like to set various DNS servers to use.
I’m not sure if this helps, but when splitting between VLANs, I used to set the choice in the DHCP server. When the devices receive a DHCP lease from you, it may be worth trying to set the DNS server you want.
Thank you so much! Since new machines can be connected to the network, I was hoping to avoid having to define this at the host stage. I’ve created an alias for all of the devices that use VPN. Do you know if an alias can have its DNS servers specified?
You may also use NAT port forwarding to direct traffic to the desired server. The only drawback is that you can only specify one server at a time. Round robin of multiple servers (e.g. 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4) isn’t feasible, as far as I know.
I have a rule that takes all traffic to dst port 53 and redirects it to the router’s 127.0.0.1 port 53 (possibly inspired by @LTS Tom). Replace 127.0.0.1 with the IP address of your PIA DNS server, and limit your source IPs to the alias you made.

Setting up dns over tls & dnssec with pfsense

DNS is the source of my problem. I’m having trouble resolving hostnames. I’m also having trouble finding any more details on it. Is there anyone out there who has come across this or who can steer me in the right direction? I’d like to create a site-to-site link so that I can authenticate my users against a DC at our primary site. This is just a temporary link until we relocate.
Go to the server tab under the VPN > OpenVPN menu item, then click the Edit button for the server you’d like to change settings for, then scroll down to the “Client Settings” section. Provide a “DNS domain list to clients” by checking the box and supplying the list of servers that the VPN has access to. You’ll also need a firewall rule that allows VPN to access the LAN’s DNS servers (Or whatever interface the DNS servers are on)
Go to the server tab under the VPN > OpenVPN menu item, then click the Edit button for the server you’d like to change settings for, then scroll down to the “Client Settings” section. Provide a “DNS domain list to clients” by checking the box and supplying the list of servers that the VPN has access to. You’ll also need a firewall rule that allows VPN to access the LAN’s DNS servers (Or whatever interface the DNS servers are on)

A comprehensive guide to pfsense pt 6 – dns

If you have a UI plugin for DNS Safety enabled on pfSense, you can configure DNS Safety using the native pfSense UI. Navigate to UI / Facilities / DNS Protection after installation, as seen in the screenshot below.
By default, DNS Safety runs as the connect user. Since this user lacks privilege, it is unable to connect to port 53, which is needed by any normal DNS server. We’ll work around this by allowing DNS Safety to connect to a non-standard higher port (for example, 5353), and redirecting incoming DNS requests to that port.
Pick the LAN and Loopback interfaces the server will listen on from the UI / Services / DNS Safety / Settings page (press and hold Ctrl and click on the interface name). Then, in the Listen Port box, form 5353.
After restarting, use the sockstat -l | grep dsdns command in the terminal console to verify that the /opt/dnssafety/bin/dsdnsd process is listening on port 5353. The final product should look like this.
Check DNS overcome and blocking by using the dig command to look up the welcome.dnssafety.io domain name. If all was set up correctly, it should return NXDOMAIN. If the installation went wrong, welcome.dnssafety.io will be redirected to a legitimate IP address.

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