Not too early

Not too early

Don’t celebrate too early | athletics edition

I’m looking for a word or idiom that says it’s not a good idea to predict or celebrate anything before knowing the final result. I’m thinking about topics like political elections or football match outcomes, as well as more mundane hopes of a good outcome.
anything you say to remind someone to wait until a positive thing they’re expecting has actually happened before making plans for it: You may be able to get a bank loan, but don’t get your hopes up.
A jinx, according to superstition, is someone who often brings bad luck; “jinxing it” means talking about recent good luck will ruin it and bring bad luck until the outcome is decided.

Too early?

They have a similar sense to me, but’soon’ connotes something that comes too soon after another. ‘Early,’ on the other hand, would mean that the situation is clearly not yet ready for the proposal.
The distinction between early and soon is context-dependent. With the sense we have here, I believe soon means “after something has occurred>” and early means “early in the day, week, year, solar cycle, or whatever>.” (I’m not familiar with the abbreviations used here, but “solar cycle” is a joke.)
The teacher makes us run nonstop for six minutes in PE class at school. I failed the running test yesterday because I started running too soon (i.e. I managed to run for only four minutes and a half, then I had to stop because I started to feel sick).
The teacher makes us run nonstop for six minutes in PE class at school. I failed the running test yesterday because I started running too soon (i.e. I managed to run for only four minutes and a half, then I had to stop because I started to feel sick).

Get them early, but not too early – let’s play underrail

Are you sick of the same-old Valentine’s Day chocolates and red roses? Don’t be concerned. There are a plethora of unusual and out-of-the-box concepts available, varying in price from dirt cheap to extravagant. The majority of them would undoubtedly be cherished by your loved one. Best of all, they’re all available online and can be delivered before February 14th.
For Cheese Addicts: Wisconsin Cheese has proclaimed cheese to be the universal love language for the year 2021. You can nominate a loved one or friend to receive one of Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin’s 500 limited edition gift boxes through January 31, just in time for Valentine’s Day. The rules can be found here.
For Animal Addicts: Donate to the Trunks & Leaves Elephant Adoption Program by symbolically adopting an elephant. Each elephant is a genuine Sri Lankan pachyderm, and your purchase helps to support conservation efforts. A Certificate of Adoption is included, as well as pictures of the elephant you select.
Unusual Food that makes you feel good: On Valentine’s Day, Balkan Bites, a female-owned family company, is teaming up with Telesomm for a Burek (a portable stuffed phyllo swirl) and Balkan virtual wine tasting. (Both the burek and the wine must be purchased separately.)

Dosem – too early too late

However, since certain activities are apparent, Congress should begin working on legislation to improve the country’s ability to adapt to a new pandemic in the following main areas at the same time.
When a new disease threat occurs elsewhere in the world, Congress can ensure that the contagion is kept out of the United States for as long as possible. The Department of Homeland Security in the United States must devote its full attention to this problem by developing deep expertise in science and technology. This does not imply digging moats and raising the drawbridge; rather, it implies providing equal and robust screening protocols based on science rather than bias or ethnic stereotype.
To do so, the US would need a large-scale research capacity as well as a much more efficient public health system at the state and local levels. Congress should establish a national infectious disease testing research and development program with the primary goal of improving the science of infectious disease detection and rapidly deploying the best available tests (from anywhere in the world). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States cannot perform this mission alone. The federal government should also assist state and local public health departments in developing the capacity to conduct the time-consuming, comprehensive field work required to locate and isolate any individuals who test positive.

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