Longfellow my lost youth

Longfellow my lost youth

My lost youth

Longfellow’s childhood memories are the subject of the poem. The lovely town where he was born, as well as many other locations in his hometown, are still fresh in his memory. He often returns to those memories in order to relive the past. However, he recalls certain incidents that make him sad. Some are so lovely that they also brighten his mind. However, some lines from the “Lapland Poem” echo within him in between those reflections. It serves as a reminder that “youthful thoughts are long, long thoughts.”
The poem’s poetic persona begins with a description of the old town where he once resided. In his imagination, he sees the streets of the town, the rolling sea waves, and the forests that surround the town. He transforms into a child once more, capturing those memories. During his childhood, the poet recalls how his boyish imagination shone brightly on everything. In addition, this poem includes a slew of other memories. Finally, the poet explains how his hometown feels today as he returns. His heart is still captivated by the freshness of the town and the gleaming leaves of the Deering wood. But the old song keeps playing in his head. The youth of one’s life is fleeting. What’s left is a half-hearted re-enactment of the memories.

My lost youth

Sirma was a source for Johannes Schefferus when he wrote his book Lapponia, in addition to his ecclesiastical work (1673). The lyrics to two joiks were among Sirmas’ many contributions. These two joiks, which were love poems, were translated into Latin in Lapponia and then distributed throughout the world as Schefferus’ book was translated into other languages. Longfellow referred to and quoted a line from one of these joiks, Moarsi favrrot (“My beautiful girlfriend”), also known as Oarrejávri (“Squirrel Lake”), in his poem “My Lost youth” (1855).

Henry wadsworth longfellow – my lost youth (edited text in

A fascinating aspect of writing a poem is how it can propose a topic to the reader while still expressing a tangent subtly. Recently, I’ve been bombarded with attribution questions in defense, which reminded me of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem:
Despite the fact that it is about a particular location, this could happen anywhere. In 1855, he set out to depict an idyllic life in Portland, Oregon, according to legend. What “beautiful town by the sea” does not, however, have “pleasant streets” with “shadowy lines of its trees”? Is it shocking to read of an old American shipping town with “black wharves and the slips” under “the fort upon the hill”?
So, decoding the poem exposes a collection of transient (pun intended) emotions that defy clear attribution to a specific city. A young boy enthralled by a generalized theory of adventure expresses himself through action words. Since no particular position is mentioned, the meaning of the seventh stanza action lines (7th) appears to unlock a message about generic youthful rotations: haunting, murmurs, humming, throbs, goes, flutters, sings, come, sighing, repeating. “Lost youth” is an apt term….

“my lost youth” by henry wadsworth longfellow

The speaker often remembers a seaside town from his childhood and the memories associated with it. These memories appear to whisper the song of his childhood to him. “A boy’s will is the wind’s will / And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts,” the refrain repeats at the end of each stanza.
He remembers the sea islands, the black wharves, the sea-tides, and the sailors and their sails. He also recalls the fort on a hill. He remembers a naval battle and the sea captains who were killed in the battle and are now buried. He recalls a schoolboy’s sentiments, which are partly a prophecy and partly a wild yearning. There are things that can’t be said, dreams that can’t die, and feelings that can transform a strong heart into a fragile one, according to the speaker.
When the speaker returns to the old town, he encounters unusual types, but the native air is pure and sweet. His heart returns to the woods, where he re-discovers his lost youth, along with a strange yet beautiful song called the refrain.

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