Korea communications standards commission

Korea communications standards commission

Korean fcc

Since its inception in 2000, the South Korean television rating system has had only four classifications: All, 7, 13, and 18. All shows, with the exception of domestic dramas (which have been expected since November 2002), have been required to have a rating system since February 2001. Rating 13 was changed to 12 in 2007, and a new rating, 15, was added. Except for the “exempt” rating below, most programs must be rated. A broadcaster can apply a rating even if it qualifies for exemption. [number four]
The rating icons may be transparent and placed in the upper left or upper right corner of the screen. The icon has black writing on a yellow circle with a white outline and is at least 1/20 the size of the computer. When the program begins, these icons are shown for 30 seconds, then every 10 minutes and when the program resumes after commercial breaks. This does not extend to 19-rated shows, which must have the icon visible during the entire show.
A five-second rating disclaimer appears at the start of the program, stating “This program is not appropriate for children under the age of X, so parental supervision is required”(X /, I peu-ro-geu-raem eun “X: se-mi-man “X: se-mi-man “X: se-mi-man “X: se-mi-man “X: se-mi-man “X: se-mi-man “X: se-mi-man “X: se-mi-man ui eo rin-i/cheong-so nyeon-i si cheong hagi e bu-jeok jeol ha-meu robo hoja ui si cheong-ji doga pir-yo han peu-ro-geu-raem ipnida ui si cheong-ji doga pir-yo han peu-ro-geu- The disclaimers for the “All” and “19” scores are different, saying “This program is appropriate for all ages”( ) and “This program is forbidden for children under the age of 19″( 19 ).

Ministry of information and communication south korea

Since its inception in 2000, the South Korean television rating system has had only four classifications: All, 7, 13, and 18. All shows, with the exception of domestic dramas (which have been expected since November 2002), have been required to have a rating system since February 2001. Rating 13 was changed to 12 in 2007, and a new rating, 15, was added. Except for the “exempt” rating below, most programs must be rated. A broadcaster can apply a rating even if it qualifies for exemption. [number four]
The rating icons may be transparent and placed in the upper left or upper right corner of the screen. The icon has black writing on a yellow circle with a white outline and is at least 1/20 the size of the computer. When the program begins, these icons are shown for 30 seconds, then every 10 minutes and when the program resumes after commercial breaks. This does not extend to 19-rated shows, which must have the icon visible during the entire show.
A five-second rating disclaimer appears at the start of the program, stating that “This program is prohibited for children under the age of X, so parental accompaniment is needed” (X/, I peu-ro-geu-raem eun) “X stands for “semi-man.” ui eo rin-i/cheong-so nyeon-i si cheong hagi e bu-jeok jeol ha-meu robo hoja ui si cheong-ji doga pir-yo han peu-ro-geu-raem ipnida ui si cheong-ji doga pir-yo han peu-ro-geu- The disclaimers for the “All” and “19” scores are different, saying “This program is appropriate for all ages”( ) and “This program is forbidden for children under the age of 19″( 19 ).

Korea telecom authority

With 30,200 cases (35.6 percent), the bulk of the material was related to prostitution and indecency, followed by gambling. Pornographic material that depicts human genitals or sexual acts in detail was found in 28,623 cases (94.8 percent).
The increase in the number of correction orders issued as a result of user reports is particularly noteworthy: 18,789 cases in 2017 compared to 8,450 cases in 2016. (up by 122.4 percent ). This is due to a greater public understanding of the dangers of obscene online material.
In response to the announcement on September 26, 2017, the Commission will develop a fast-track deliberation mechanism to expedite the deliberation process and a dedicated digital sex crime taskforce.
2. Korea Communications Standards Commission (KCSC) press release, February 14, 2018, KCSC to install a fast-track deliberation mechanism and dedicated taskforce to accelerate its deliberation process for illicit video content and avoid the spread of digital sex crimes.

Korea communications commission

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