Interactive digital narrative

Interactive digital narrative

Unity hyperlinked interactive digital storytelling

The development of short, personal narratives using pictures, sounds, and text in a multimedia computer-based platform is known as digital storytelling. Digital storytelling has been used in education to facilitate learning in both formal and informal environments around the world. The authors examine arguments about the utility of digital storytelling for promoting different forms of learning and conceptualize it as a context rather than a method. The authors discuss the role of digital storytelling as an interactive digital media (IDM) context in shaping youths’ opportunities to be active authors and participants in a media production culture, which is a growing focus of education across the globe, using examples from digital storytelling workshops their research team has designed for Secondary English classrooms in Singapore. A dual mandate to resonate with and build upon youths’ daily media habits as well as promote critical thinking dispositions is wrapped up in principles of 21st century literacy, digital literacies, and new media, and the authors give brief suggestions to these ends as they relate to digital storytelling-as-context and the learning sciences.

What’s an interactive narrative?

What effects do the socio-technical affordances of digital health and science narrative and storytelling, especially interactivity, have on audience experience, message cohesion, knowledge acquisition, emotional engagement, and, ultimately, health/science literacy? At any point during peer review, Frontiers reserves the right to direct an out-of-scope manuscript to a more appropriate section or journal.
What effects do the socio-technical affordances of digital health and science narrative and storytelling, especially interactivity, have on audience experience, message cohesion, knowledge acquisition, emotional engagement, and, ultimately, health/science literacy? At any point during peer review, Frontiers reserves the right to direct an out-of-scope manuscript to a more appropriate section or journal.

How to create visual storytelling using an interactive

The International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS) is the premier conference for game narrative and interactive storytelling researchers and practitioners, addressing theoretical, technical, and applied design practices. The annual conference brings together computational narratology, narrative systems, storytelling technology, and humanities-inspired theoretical inquiry, academic study, and creative expression in an interdisciplinary environment.
Invited speakers, research and practitioner presentations, art shows, seminars, lectures, and a doctoral consortium will all be part of ICIDS 2020. The core theme of this year’s conference is “Interactive Digital Narrative Scholarship,” which builds on a recurring theme of the conference in recent years, which has tried to establish the methodologies, scholarly, and science foundations of Interactive Digital Narrative as an academic discipline. As we continue to define the discipline of immersive digital narrative scholarship, anchor the culture around it, and rigorously refine the vocabulary, philosophy, and methodologies within our area, we hope to build on this dialogue.

Interactive storytelling brings the best and most engaging

The second installment of Interactive Digital Narrative: History, Theory, and Practice is now available. For coverage of the book’s history section, see my previous column (and one practice chapter that I took out of order because it felt like it fit better that way).
The section starts with a brief summary from the volume editors, which offers a fair sketch of academic debates over the last two decades, as well as a bibliography of a variety of foundational pieces in this field. I may have included Jesper Juul’s half-real in this list because it is a readable and convincing conclusion to the narratology vs. ludology debate.
Despite the fact that I have enough of an academic background to be comfortable reading these posts, I often find theory discussions of interactive storytelling to be completely unrelated to what I am doing. It’s not so much that it’s misguided as it is that it spends a lot of time asking questions that have little bearing on my creative practice or critique, or that I don’t find useful outside of the framework of a particular work and artistic brief.

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