Fortigate port forwarding

Fortigate port forwarding

Fortigate port forwarding

On a Fortigate 50B, I’m having a lot of trouble setting up port forwarding. The device is set to factory defaults, with the wan1 interface linked to my fiber optic internet modem and my lan connected to the Fortigate’s internal switch. The factory default firewall policy that allows traffic from the internal interface to wan1 is maintained, and I can access the internet normally.
Now I’m unable to connect to the internet from my server, and I’m also unable to connect to the webserver from the internet. I may ping a website from the outside, but all web traffic is blocked in both directions.
It turns out that you must use the external ip of the wan1 interface rather than 0.0.0.0, which the documentation says is true for any ip. That’s inconvenient because, for example, if my wan interface’s ip-address changes due to a power outage, all port forwardings would stop working. But, at the very least, it now functions.

Virtual ips for port forwarding

This recipe demonstrates how to configure port forwarding on a FortiGate device using virtual IPs. There is only one public external IP address in this case. TCP ports 8080, 8081, and 8082 are mapped to TCP port 80 on internal WebServers. This enables remote connections to communicate with a firewalled server.
This recipe demonstrates how to configure port forwarding on a FortiGate device using virtual IPs. There is only one public external IP address in this case. TCP ports 8080, 8081, and 8082 are mapped to TCP port 80 on internal WebServers. This enables remote connections to communicate with a firewalled server.

How to configure port forwarding on a firewall or router

I saw a Jaguar response to a query that detailed how to do it for a known external IP, but I need to do it for any external IP. I figured I’d just use 0.0.0.0 for the external address and follow the same steps, but it doesn’t work as well as I had hoped.
If anyone has any knowledge of the FortiGate 110C and could answer a few questions for me, I would be grateful. I’m new to the “high end” networking environment, and this is a challenging challenge for someone who has never used a router that is more complicated than a basic home networking router…
You just need to do it for the WAN IP address of the Fortigate. When a packet arrives from the WAN, the Fortigate knows to forward it to a specific internal IP on a specific port. As a result, you can connect port 1234 on the WAN to port 5678 on the internal IP. Since you still have a modem (and possibly more devices) between the Fortigate and the internet, the source of the internet IP does not matter to the Fortigate as long as it comes in via the WAN interface (because the WAN interface normally has only one IP address assigned to it).

Port forwarding on fortigate firewall – part 7

Allow me to demonstrate how to allow incoming FTP traffic on the FortiGate firewall system so that you can host FTP sites for the outside world in this post. To complete this task, we will use the port forwarding technique. All FTP requests sent to the external (WAN) interface will be forwarded to the internal network’s FTP server. FortiGate is a well-known hardware firewall that can defend your home or office network against network attacks. To protect the network, we can set up a range of firewall policies and filtering options. It can also be used as a web application firewall if you’re hosting web or FTP pages on your own server but want to give external users access through the internet.
We previously published instructions for setting up an FTP server on Windows 10/8.1 and enabling FTP traffic via the Windows firewall service. This post would be useful if you want to host the same FTP site from a Windows PC or a Windows 2012 R2 server to the external network using the FortiGate firewall.
If your WAN interface’s IP address changes dynamically, you can use a “dynamic DNS” service like DynDNS to map the same web address name to an IP address. This guide to setting up DynDNS on Fortigate can be found here.

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