Does formatting remove viruses

Does formatting remove viruses

Virus: hard drive format |

I was fascinated by this question and read a few posts, but it appears that there are two schools of thought on the subject. Will a standard Format action make all threats inactive if a known malware / virus is present on one’s HDD, or does the affected HDD need to be fully wiped through a data destruction tool such as “dban” or other HDD cleaning tools? Over the last couple of years, I’ve been using “Gparted” to do a simple Format prior to routine cloning and haven’t had any issues after formatting an infected HDD and reusing it as a cloned spare verifiable functioning HDD. I’ve recovered my PC three times using this process, in which I run the machine normally after downloading the HDD. I’ve read posts from both sides of this debate. According to one post, a standard format would remove all malware and virus threats (rather than erasing all 1s and 0s, but essentially cleaning the affected HDD of all threats so it can be used as a protected backup HDD). Those papers tend to reflect the majority perspective. After a hazard item or items have been found on an HDD, I’ve read conflicting opinions suggesting that the HDD be absolutely cleaned.

Format virus (.format file) – remove + restore data

I haven’t used the USB drive since then, and all I’ve done is go to the websites I normally go to… nothing shady. Following the fresh install, I ran a complete scan with Malware Bytes’ paid version. All was found to be clean. Bitdefender paid version was downloaded and a complete scan of the entire machine was performed. All is spotless.
I’ve discovered that copying files from one hard drive to the other will cause my computer to become unusable. It will freeze on a different file every time. Canceling explorer simply causes it to freeze, after which it flickers and ceases working until the computer is restarted. When I restart my machine, it displays no icons, all anti-virus software is uninstalled (this time both malwarebytes and bitdefender), and I’m unable to use it until I restart it again. I’ll soon be able to log into Windows and no longer be the administrator. My machine now has a new account, and all of my anti-virus software is disabled and unreachable.
Any tips on how to get rid of contaminated files will be appreciated. Otherwise, I think I’ll just have to format it, even if it’s not on C:. Both backups and current files will be lost as a result of this. Although nothing is encrypted, I am unable to copy it without Windows crashing. Anti-virus and anti-malware software both return negative results.

How to remove a virus from your computer (official dell tech

An older laptop belonging to one of my customers has been contaminated with the “Machine Patch” scareware. Alureon rootkit was also included. Since it’s an older, non-critical laptop, I decided it wasn’t worth the effort after the first few attempts failed. I told him that wiping it clean and reinstalling it would be faster and less costly. That made me wonder…
I’d use a proper wipe program, such as Wipe Drive Pro. We have a DOD-approved program that writes all zeros, all ones, and then a randon write to the hard drive. Using a boot disk or USB, it writes directly to the drive. After that, there’s nothing left on the drive 😉
I’d use a proper wipe program, such as Wipe Drive Pro. We have a DOD-approved program that writes all zeros, all ones, and then a randon write to the hard drive. Using a boot disk or USB, it writes directly to the drive. After that, there’s nothing left on the drive 😉
Actually, I believe someone here got it or a version of it, but they didn’t have admin rights, and combo fixed skipped it. I was able to get rid of it by performing a system restore and then removing the other system restores. Since I didn’t know what kind of malware it was, I skipped a lot of registry keys…

How to reset windows 10 after a virus or prepare the

Luigi Oppido contributed to this article as a co-author. Pleasure Point Computers is owned and run by Luigi Oppido in Santa Cruz, California. Luigi has over 25 years of computer repair, data recovery, malware removal, and update experience. He’s also the host of the Computer Man Show!, which has been broadcast on KSQD for over two years and covers central California.
Luigi Oppido contributed to this article as a co-author. Pleasure Point Computers is owned and run by Luigi Oppido in Santa Cruz, California. Luigi has over 25 years of computer repair, data recovery, malware removal, and update experience. He’s also the host of the Computer Man Show!, which has been broadcast on KSQD for over two years and covers central California. 619,409 people have viewed this post.
“The definition of a shortcut virus was helpful. I had already opened the infected file (which resulted in the closing of opened programs every few minutes), but I believe I was able to delete it using safe mode. “…” read more

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