Couldnt agree more

Couldnt agree more

“couldn’t agree more” (in)

how these non-trade treaties (multilateral environmental agreements, or MEAs) can be implemented in a way that effectively counterbalances the WTO’s free-trade agenda through prioritizing social, public health, labor, and environmental concerns, and that such MEAs are not only fully enforceable but that the values they seek to protect are built into policy-making at every level
If there are more versions available (someone else may be the perpetrator) and the available evidences do not exclude one of the versions, then the proof collection must proceed until all available evidences support only one version of facts and exclude all other versions of facts (it couldn’t have happened any other way). drtatar.hu drtatar.hu drtatar.h
And, as the workforce becomes more mobile, more time is spent than ever attempting to access communications remotely: In reality, according to a recent end-user survey conducted by Insignia Research on behalf of Siemens, respondents lost an average of 7.8 hours per month because they couldn’t access the features and functions they had in the office while working.

Pipilotti rist- i couldn’t agree with you more

So, with that sentence, I’d like to express my full agreement with someone. I recall that the former merely expresses my thoughts, but my friend insists that the latter is right, and she is adamant about her decision.
‘I’m sorry, but I can’t agree any longer’ —- This isn’t a common stock word, but it conveys the idea that you’ve changed your mind and disagree with what’s being said. (The same as ‘I can’t agree with you anymore.’)
Some people seem to believe that ‘anymore’ and ‘any more’ are both different spellings of the same word, whereas others believe the two words have different meanings. I believe I am in the second camp, but I have no clear feelings about it.
The difference is that ‘anymore’ is interpreted to mean ‘no longer’ or ‘nowadays,’ and hence has a sense of time. ‘Any more’ is taken to mean ‘no more’ in a quantity-related context.

Teljesen egyetértek angolul – i couldn’t agree more meaning

how these non-trade treaties (multilateral environmental agreements, or MEAs) can be implemented in a way that effectively counterbalances the WTO’s free-trade agenda through prioritizing social, public health, labor, and environmental concerns, and that such MEAs are not only fully enforceable but that the values they seek to protect are built into policy-making at every level
If there are more versions available (someone else may be the perpetrator) and the available evidences do not exclude one of the versions, then the proof collection must proceed until all available evidences support only one version of facts and exclude all other versions of facts (it couldn’t have happened any other way). drtatar.hu drtatar.hu drtatar.h
And, as the workforce becomes more mobile, more time is spent than ever attempting to access communications remotely: In fact, according to a recent end-user survey conducted by Insignia Research on behalf of Siemens, respondents lost an average of 7.8 hours per month because they couldn’t access the features and functions they had in the office while working.

Mccain couldn’t agree more

It can be used in any direction. Saying ‘I couldn’t agree with you more’ or ‘I couldn’t agree with you more’ is appropriate. The second use is a bit more relaxed than the first, but it’s still perfectly appropriate.
The negative is essential because the phrase’s intention is to demonstrate how strongly you agree with others. In reality, you agree with them so completely that it is physically impossible for you to disagree with them any more. Is this of any assistance?
If you fully agree with someone 100 percent, that ensures you will never agree with them more than 100 percent, such as 101 percent or 110 percent. ‘I couldn’t agree with you more’ implies ‘you agree with him to the fullest extent possible, which is 100 percent, and you can’t possibly agree with him any more.’
Assume you’ve asked for a big glass of water. I fill a glass with water all the way to the top. ‘It sure is a big drink – in fact, I couldn’t have filled the glass any more,’ I say as I hand you the water.
‘The government should make Friday part of the weekend,’ I may suggest. You may feel so strongly about this argument that you want to emphasize it to me by saying, “I couldn’t agree with you more.” Consider water: your agreement has taken up all of the available room and is as complete as it can be.

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